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#1 2017-06-08 00:51:11

johnraff
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From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 4,673
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How can I add new software?

The question of how to add new software keeps coming up, so I'm reposting something from CrunchBang, slightly edited.

  1. Check the repository. If your app is there (with perhaps a slightly different name) the version might be a bit old but check: if it does what you want, end of search!

  2. Check the backports. It's usually safe enough to install one app + its dependencies from the Jessie backports.

  3. If your package is not there, or the version is too old for your requirements (make sure you really need a newer version) then there are alternative approaches. For some ideas see the next post.

  4. Search the BunsenLabs forum for suggestions. (Be careful, though.)

  5. Start a new thread explaining what you need.

Everywhere in these forums we warn people not to add Ubuntu PPA's to their apt sources.lists. While there are a few third-party repositories which are somewhat safer to use, in general you should keep to the standard Debian repository your system was set up with, unless you know how to deal with the consequences!
Even with individual packages, adding ones that are not in your regular Debian repositories often causes complications, and sometimes major trouble, so make sure you really need them, and be careful!


John
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#2 2017-06-08 01:48:24

johnraff
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From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 4,673
Website

Re: How can I add new software?

Advanced options

If the options in Post #1 don't work out, and you feel confident to deal with issues that might come up - or don't care if your system is detroyed - then you might consider these:

get the deb:

If the package you want is in a different Debian suite, just go to the download page of the package (eg for banshee 2.9 here), download the .deb file and open it with gdebi. If you're on Jessie like me, gdebi will tell you you need 'libglib2.0-0 (>= 2.46.2)'. That package is luckily available from jessie-backports, but libglib is a very important package so in this case we can't be completely sure that no other packages will be disturbed by upgrading it. When the dependencies are easily installed, however, this is the simplest way to get a specific package. Con: it won't get any automatic upgrades, but sometimes that's what you want.

NOTE: Ubuntu packages often depend on libraries that don't exist in Debian, or are installed into different paths, so they are by no means guaranteed to work on a Debian system, but sometimes in individual cases you might be lucky.

OBS repos

MX developer Steve Pusser (forum member stevep) has made a lot of backported packages for Debian. See this post for instructions for mandelbulber, and here is his multimedia repo.

stevep has also written a guide to using the OBS as a personal custom repository:

http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=130057

compile:

The "proper" way to do it is to compile the package from source for your system then to create a custom .deb and install that.

Guides here:

http://forums.debian.net/viewtopic.php?f=16&t=38976

https://www.debian.org/doc/manuals/maint-guide/

Backporting packages from a newer Debian suite sometimes works well: Simple Backport Creation, and it's sometimes possible to make a Debian version of a package from an Ubuntu ppa: CreatePackageFromPPA

Last edited by Head_on_a_Stick (2017-06-09 07:02:10)


John
--------------------
( a boring Japan blog , Japan Links, idle twitterings  and GitStuff )
In case you forget, the rules.

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#3 2017-06-08 01:58:06

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 4,673
Website

Re: How can I add new software?

Recommends

In Debian, and BunsenLabs, apt is configured to install "recommended" packages by default. These days hard drives are big and extra packages usually do no harm, but sometimes installing a package with all its recommends brings in a lot of other applications you don't want or need. In such cases you can install like this:

sudo apt-get install packagename --no-install-recommends

Just be sure that you aren't leaving out some packages that you really want. You can use apt-get's -s option to simulate what your command will do.

Example: gedit - a GNOME text editor with a simulated get:

 29 Jan 15 | 14:52:34 ~
    $ sget gedit
alias sget = sudo apt-get install --no-install-recommends --simulate
[sudo] password for sector11: 
 {snip}
The following extra packages will be installed:
  gedit-common gir1.2-clutter-1.0 gir1.2-cogl-1.0 gir1.2-coglpango-1.0 gir1.2-gstreamer-0.10
  gir1.2-gtksource-3.0 gir1.2-json-1.0 gir1.2-peas-1.0 gnome-js-common libclutter-1.0-0 libcogl-pango0
  libcogl9 libgtksourceview-3.0-0 libgtksourceview-3.0-common libjson-glib-1.0-0 libpeas-1.0-0 libpeas-common
  libseed-gtk3-0 python-gi-cairo
Suggested packages:
  gedit-plugins
Recommended packages:
  yelp libclutter-1.0-common libcogl-common
 {snip}
0 upgraded, 20 newly installed, 0 to remove and 0 not upgraded.

Now you can check: Suggested packages: gedit-plugins and Recommended packages: yelp libclutter-1.0-common libcogl-common to see if you want them.

Package maintainers' attitudes to recommends seem to vary a bit. If they all kept to the current Debian policy, you might well want to install the recommends too. For example see here.

Last edited by johnraff (2017-06-12 03:59:49)


John
--------------------
( a boring Japan blog , Japan Links, idle twitterings  and GitStuff )
In case you forget, the rules.

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#4 2017-06-26 21:24:32

hhh
That's easy!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 6,101
Website

Re: How can I add new software?

I've learned a few things since I posted this, but it still works...

HowTo: Create debs from Testing/Unstable/Experimental/Ubuntu/PPA
https://forums.bunsenlabs.org/viewtopic.php?id=58

Last edited by johnraff (2017-06-27 00:06:17)

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