You are not logged in.

#1 2022-05-21 20:37:43

Colonel Panic
Member
Registered: 2018-11-13
Posts: 549

Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

Hi everyone. I sometimes want to use Windows software such as Textpad (which I think is one of the best text editors available), which because I don't have Windows installed on my machine means that I need to run Wine. However, I haven't found any of the implementations of it very user-friendly (and Crossover certainly isn't in my experience, although it purports to be, and I also think that at $48 it's not cheap).

Has anyone got any advice concerning how they got Wine to run on their system in the most user-friendly way possible? Did you use Crossover, PlayOnLinux or maybe something else?

Thanks in advance,

CP .

Last edited by Colonel Panic (2022-05-21 20:49:37)

Offline

#2 2022-05-21 22:19:04

Bearded_Blunder
Dodging A Bullet
From: Seat: seat0; vc7
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 978

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

When WINE plays nice it's pretty effortless, when it doesn't, it's a complete pain & you sometimes still don't get really satisfactory results no matter what config you do or add-ons you enable..

If the licence isn't a problem, then I suggest a Windows VM, either VMWare or VirtualBox both have nice seamless modes that integrate fairly well.. & there's very rarely an issue getting Windows software to run under Windows.

I've basically stopped fighting WINE into submission for each app, if it isn't right more or less straight after the software installer runs with minimal tweaking it goes in a Windows VM.

Between the shared clipboard, shared folders & drag & drop with all the extensions & additions I can use Windows software nearly as easily as native software VirtualBox VM or not.. it's a bit of a resource hog, & there's some delay starting a program when you have to boot virtual Windows first, but I find it less hassle all round than WINE.

For a text editor though? That's one thing Linux has scads of good options for, probably more & better than Windows has ... it's a shame it wasn't Notepad++, because notepadqq is a virtual clone of that if you ran Bookworm/Sid (or maybe it'd backport to Bullseye?).  I like Scite as an alternative to Geany, which I recognise isn't everyone's cup of tea, mentioning tea, there's another Linux text editor with more features than notepad.. but less heavy than say Geany.. I could list potential candidates for it seems like half of forever.


Blessed is he who expecteth nothing, for he shall not be disappointed...
If there's an obscure or silly way to break it, but you don't know what.. Just ask me

Offline

#3 2022-05-22 01:16:43

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 8,971
Website

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

Bearded_Blunder wrote:

...Notepad++, because notepadqq is a virtual clone of that

I used to like notepad++ very much when I ran W98 - thanks for the news about notepadqq!


...elevator in the Brain Hotel, broken down but just as well...
( a boring Japan blog (currently paused), idle Twitterings and GitStuff )

Introduction to the Bunsenlabs Lithium Desktop

Offline

#4 2022-05-22 06:23:08

Colonel Panic
Member
Registered: 2018-11-13
Posts: 549

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

Bearded_Blunder wrote:

When WINE plays nice it's pretty effortless, when it doesn't, it's a complete pain & you sometimes still don't get really satisfactory results no matter what config you do or add-ons you enable..

If the licence isn't a problem, then I suggest a Windows VM, either VMWare or VirtualBox both have nice seamless modes that integrate fairly well.. & there's very rarely an issue getting Windows software to run under Windows.

I've basically stopped fighting WINE into submission for each app, if it isn't right more or less straight after the software installer runs with minimal tweaking it goes in a Windows VM.

Between the shared clipboard, shared folders & drag & drop with all the extensions & additions I can use Windows software nearly as easily as native software VirtualBox VM or not.. it's a bit of a resource hog, & there's some delay starting a program when you have to boot virtual Windows first, but I find it less hassle all round than WINE.

For a text editor though? That's one thing Linux has scads of good options for, probably more & better than Windows has ... it's a shame it wasn't Notepad++, because notepadqq is a virtual clone of that if you ran Bookworm/Sid (or maybe it'd backport to Bullseye?).  I like Scite as an alternative to Geany, which I recognise isn't everyone's cup of tea, mentioning tea, there's another Linux text editor with more features than notepad.. but less heavy than say Geany.. I could list potential candidates for it seems like half of forever.

Thanks for the reply. The licence is a problem, unfortunately; I haven't had an installable copy of Windows since ME (and I was given that one). No longer have Windows on my computer at all.

My focus in this thread isn't so much on WINE itself, which I agree is flawed, as it is on the likes of CrossOver and PlayOnLinux which aim to make WINE easier to use.

I agree that the choice of text editors for Linux is very good if you're a programmer; I use them for writing notes and short documents, though, for which Textpad is still excellent. I use GVim a lot too (and Cream, which is a set of scripts that makes GVim more beginner-friendly).

Last edited by Colonel Panic (2022-05-22 06:28:23)

Offline

#5 2022-05-22 14:54:46

Bearded_Blunder
Dodging A Bullet
From: Seat: seat0; vc7
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 978

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

My focus in this thread ...  is on the likes of CrossOver and PlayOnLinux ...

My experience with the likes of those has been most frustrating & has met with occasional limited or partial success only, maybe I pick the wrong apps. The major input to POL seems to be from the gaming community, & I'd imagine their main focus is therefore making games work, which they reportedly manage quite often.

Having both WINE and some extension to configure for a program is never going to be all that user-friendly, & when you hit issues you're consequently never quite sure which set of settings to tweak. It's back & forth at least half a dozen times till you guess right, if there's a right combination at all, in my experience.


Blessed is he who expecteth nothing, for he shall not be disappointed...
If there's an obscure or silly way to break it, but you don't know what.. Just ask me

Offline

#6 2022-05-22 15:02:03

Colonel Panic
Member
Registered: 2018-11-13
Posts: 549

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

Sadly I suspect you're right, but at least POL is free; you have to pay about $48 for Crossover.

Offline

#7 2022-05-22 18:34:08

Martin
Member
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 639
Website

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

On Wine and POL: POL is supposed to make Wine user friendly. My experience is that when it works it is easy to use but when things does not work out it is really hard to make it work. I have found that using plain Wine works better in those cases. Disclaimer: I use Wine and POL very sparingly.

On text editors for non-coding use: I started using emacs org-mode some years ago and like it a lot. I use it for note-taking, for ToDo-lists and creating LaTeX-formatted PDFs. I even use it as a kind of MathCAD replacement. If you are not already a emacs user there will be a bit of learning curve to climb though.

http://orgmode.org/

/Martin


"Problems worthy of attack
prove their worth by hitting back."
Piet Hein

Offline

#8 2022-05-22 20:34:26

Colonel Panic
Member
Registered: 2018-11-13
Posts: 549

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

Thanks for the reply Martin, but I've never really been a fan of EMacs. Whenever I've installed it I've used it about twice and never again.

I use GVim quite a lot when I want a Linux editor, or Gedit or Leafpad, or one of the KDE editors if I've got that desktop environment installed.

But I still like Textpad. I wish the company would do a Linux version; they've been asked before, but have so far refused.

[Edit: just seen the org mode pages of which I wasn't previously aware, maybe I should give it another chance;

https://orgmode.org/]

Last edited by Colonel Panic (2022-05-23 06:10:44)

Offline

#9 2022-05-23 14:32:21

AndrewSmart
Member
Registered: 2019-06-10
Posts: 62

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

Colonel Panic wrote:

Sadly I suspect you're right, but at least POL is free; you have to pay about $48 for Crossover.

With Crossover comes support and funding further development of Wine. They focus development accordingly. Up to you what you want in your use-case but I think it's a good deal.

They do offer the B2B service of patching Wine to support a business's software (e.g. Textpad), and packaging their Windows product to also run on Linux/Mac/others. Mentioning this might help the Textpad company consider getting a quote.

I use Wine a lot. Requires quite the skillset to develop/debug. I can't stand VMs, their resource & maintenance overhead, and encumbrance in tasks, so I stick with Wine.

Check WineHQ and Crossover's forum for any reports on the software you're considering.

Last edited by AndrewSmart (2022-05-23 16:11:58)

Offline

#10 2022-05-23 20:04:59

Colonel Panic
Member
Registered: 2018-11-13
Posts: 549

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

AndrewSmart wrote:
Colonel Panic wrote:

Sadly I suspect you're right, but at least POL is free; you have to pay about $48 for Crossover.

With Crossover comes support and funding further development of Wine. They focus development accordingly. Up to you what you want in your use-case but I think it's a good deal.

They do offer the B2B service of patching Wine to support a business's software (e.g. Textpad), and packaging their Windows product to also run on Linux/Mac/others. Mentioning this might help the Textpad company consider getting a quote.

I use Wine a lot. Requires quite the skillset to develop/debug. I can't stand VMs, their resource & maintenance overhead, and encumbrance in tasks, so I stick with Wine.

Check WineHQ and Crossover's forum for any reports on the software you're considering.

Thanks for replying. I found it confusing to use and navigate, and for that reason and the patchy performance of the software I run on it (some of the calculations come out wrong, for example), I don't feel it's a good deal.

If I could, I'd swallow my distaste for Microsoft and buy a old copy of, say, Windows XP for a low price and turn off the internet connection on it so that it doesn't attract viruses. That would be a better solution for me than Wine (and not far from what I used to do when I bought computers with Windows already installed), but Redmond doesn't want me to have that option.

Here's what I said in my introductory post when I came here three years ago, and it's still my view although the computer I now have is slightly more recent;

"I'm not anti-Microsoft on principle but I very much dislike the fact that Windows is installed by default on most new PCs and users aren't given a choice from the get-go when there are other options available such as Bunsen Linux (and let's not forget the BSDs). I have an old and ailing computer (a 2008 Acer Aspire M1610), and think it makes a lot more sense for me to use Linux than Windows.

I like the greater control and flexibility that Linux gives me over Windows, and also the fact that, unlike in Windows, I can update the distro from just one terminal in a workspace whilst still working on something else."

Last edited by Colonel Panic (2022-05-23 20:17:28)

Offline

#11 2022-06-02 20:17:14

Colonel Panic
Member
Registered: 2018-11-13
Posts: 549

Re: Codeweavers' Crossover for Linux and alternatives

Good article on Dedoimedo this week about how to install IrfanView in Linux (in Wine);

https://www.dedoimedo.com/computers/irf … linux.html

Last edited by Colonel Panic (2022-06-02 20:47:44)

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB