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#1 2018-04-28 19:40:41

martix
Kim Jong-un Stunt Double
Registered: 2016-02-19
Posts: 1,267

Application(s) of the Day

There is ConnMan.

"The Linux Connection Manager project provides a daemon for managing Internet connections within embedded devices running the Linux operating system. The Connection Manager is designed to be slim and to use as few resources as possible."

If I'm not mistaken, it does not have to be an embedded device as it would work basically on any configuration. Still: I rarely see ConnMan in use, mostly there are network-manager, wicd or sometimes ceni installed. How come? There is even a gtk-gui and also a qt-gui with systray icon called cmst.

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#2 2018-04-29 22:26:43

hhh
That's easy!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 6,093
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Re: Application(s) of the Day

Never heard of it before, nice find.

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#3 2018-04-29 22:52:46

DeepDayze
Member
From: In Linux Land
Registered: 2017-05-28
Posts: 541

Re: Application(s) of the Day

martix wrote:

There is ConnMan.

"The Linux Connection Manager project provides a daemon for managing Internet connections within embedded devices running the Linux operating system. The Connection Manager is designed to be slim and to use as few resources as possible."

If I'm not mistaken, it does not have to be an embedded device as it would work basically on any configuration. Still: I rarely see ConnMan in use, mostly there are network-manager, wicd or sometimes ceni installed. How come? There is even a gtk-gui and also a qt-gui with systray icon called cmst.

LXqt uses ConnMan but can work with NetworkManager instead if you choose.


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#4 2018-04-29 23:02:47

PackRat
jgmenu user Numero Uno
Registered: 2015-10-02
Posts: 818

Re: Application(s) of the Day

martix wrote:

There is ConnMan.

"The Linux Connection Manager project provides a daemon for managing Internet connections within embedded devices running the Linux operating system. The Connection Manager is designed to be slim and to use as few resources as possible."

If I'm not mistaken, it does not have to be an embedded device as it would work basically on any configuration. Still: I rarely see ConnMan in use, mostly there are network-manager, wicd or sometimes ceni installed. How come? There is even a gtk-gui and also a qt-gui with systray icon called cmst.

It's what I use. Reliable and much lower memory footprint than NetworkManager and wicd.


A thousand miles can lead so many ways,
just to know who is driving what a help it would be
        -- John Lodge

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#5 2018-04-29 23:20:09

DeepDayze
Member
From: In Linux Land
Registered: 2017-05-28
Posts: 541

Re: Application(s) of the Day

PackRat wrote:
martix wrote:

There is ConnMan.

"The Linux Connection Manager project provides a daemon for managing Internet connections within embedded devices running the Linux operating system. The Connection Manager is designed to be slim and to use as few resources as possible."

If I'm not mistaken, it does not have to be an embedded device as it would work basically on any configuration. Still: I rarely see ConnMan in use, mostly there are network-manager, wicd or sometimes ceni installed. How come? There is even a gtk-gui and also a qt-gui with systray icon called cmst.

It's what I use. Reliable and much lower memory footprint than NetworkManager and wicd.

Does ConnMan work with VPN connections like NetworkManager? I do know Wicd does not have builtin VPN support.


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#6 2018-04-30 16:08:39

martix
Kim Jong-un Stunt Double
Registered: 2016-02-19
Posts: 1,267

Re: Application(s) of the Day

^It does work with VPN, there is even a connman-VPN package in the debian repos. Thanks for mentioning LXqt, that's really interesting if a distro uses it instead of the network-manager.

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#7 2018-04-30 16:40:45

PackRat
jgmenu user Numero Uno
Registered: 2015-10-02
Posts: 818

Re: Application(s) of the Day

DeepDayze wrote:
PackRat wrote:
martix wrote:

There is ConnMan.

"The Linux Connection Manager project provides a daemon for managing Internet connections within embedded devices running the Linux operating system. The Connection Manager is designed to be slim and to use as few resources as possible."

If I'm not mistaken, it does not have to be an embedded device as it would work basically on any configuration. Still: I rarely see ConnMan in use, mostly there are network-manager, wicd or sometimes ceni installed. How come? There is even a gtk-gui and also a qt-gui with systray icon called cmst.

It's what I use. Reliable and much lower memory footprint than NetworkManager and wicd.

Does ConnMan work with VPN connections like NetworkManager? I do know Wicd does not have builtin VPN support.

Connman has a connman-vpn cli/daemon, but I've never used it.


A thousand miles can lead so many ways,
just to know who is driving what a help it would be
        -- John Lodge

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#8 2018-05-01 01:00:28

DeepDayze
Member
From: In Linux Land
Registered: 2017-05-28
Posts: 541

Re: Application(s) of the Day

PackRat wrote:
DeepDayze wrote:
PackRat wrote:

It's what I use. Reliable and much lower memory footprint than NetworkManager and wicd.

Does ConnMan work with VPN connections like NetworkManager? I do know Wicd does not have builtin VPN support.

Connman has a connman-vpn cli/daemon, but I've never used it.

Cool I will test this out on a stock install in a VM. If ConnMan works well, maybe this could be used in Lithium as an option?

Last edited by DeepDayze (2018-05-01 01:02:53)


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#9 2018-05-01 06:01:00

Head_on_a_Stick
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From: London
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 8,759
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Re: Application(s) of the Day

DeepDayze wrote:

If ConnMan works well, maybe this could be used in Lithium as an option?

BunsenLabs already has ifupdown and systemd-networkd available as alternative connection methods, I don't think we need another one.


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#10 2018-06-04 19:00:04

grapefruit
Member
Registered: 2017-01-03
Posts: 16

Re: Application(s) of the Day

A feature-light lightweight alternative to redshift.

sct

sct wrote:

Set screen color temperature

sct is a small C program to change the screen color temperature. It can be used to reduce or increase the amount of blue light produced by the screen.

sct sets the color temperature of the screen via xrandr like redshift. Unlike redshift, it is only 80 lines of C and will not change the screen temperature automatically.

Use:

$ sct 4000

or assign a keybind:

    <keybind key="C-A-Down">
      <action name="Execute">
        <command>x-terminal-emulator -T 'sct' -e sct 4000</command>
      </action>
    </keybind>

Last edited by grapefruit (2018-06-05 05:07:43)

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#11 2018-06-05 04:14:31

ohnonot
...again
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 3,190
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

grapefruit wrote:

A lightweight alternative to redshift

that's misleading.
sct has none of the automated/daemon and geoIP functionalities of redshift.
it just changes the screen's colour temperature as specified on the command line, and exits.

that said, i use & prefer it (inside a small self-written "daemon") over redshift.

i realised that i need the shift to warmer tones at least an hour before i go to sleep, but that's at the same time in summer or in winter (if i have to work the next day that is).
so at least the geographical location feature is pointless for me, and suddenly redshift looks much less nifty.

PS:
grapefruit, i just realised that you posted a software recommendation to some sort of help thread.
we have at least one thread "handy command line stuff" or such, that is better suited for this.

Last edited by ohnonot (2018-06-05 04:19:54)

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#12 2018-06-05 05:06:50

grapefruit
Member
Registered: 2017-01-03
Posts: 16

Re: Application(s) of the Day

Correct, on both counts. smile

I've amended my post,

In my defence, I did include what the program actually does, so a quick read would reveal to what extent it is an alternative. smile

Also, could a mod move my post to the correct place, and maybe the few above it mentioning ConnMan (which is what threw me)?

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#13 2018-06-05 06:04:09

Head_on_a_Stick
Member
From: London
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 8,759
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

DeepDayze wrote:

If ConnMan works well, maybe this could be used in Lithium as an option?

The Devuan packages should be installable in BunsenLabs: their ASCII branch is compatible with Debian stretch and BL-He.

EDIT: oh, it's in Debian, I must be getting confused  ops

The stretch package can be installed in BunsenLabs Helium.

Last edited by Head_on_a_Stick (2018-06-05 06:05:32)


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#14 2018-06-05 07:31:04

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 4,669
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

ohnonot wrote:

grapefruit, i just realised that you posted a software recommendation to some sort of help thread.
we have at least one thread "handy command line stuff" or such, that is better suited for this.

I was wondering, we could perhaps use a dedicated thread for app recommendations? Little things that don't justify a whole thread. Maybe "Try this app!" or something?

If so, a mod can move the relevant posts over from here.


John
--------------------
( a boring Japan blog , Japan Links, idle twitterings  and GitStuff )
In case you forget, the rules.

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#15 2018-06-06 01:01:51

hhh
That's easy!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 6,093
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

johnraff wrote:

Little things that don't justify a whole thread. Maybe "Try this app!" or something?

I'm worried that would become a ridiculously long thread of everyone's flavor-of-the-month program, but I'm not against giving it a try. I'm sure some interesting applications would get posted.

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#16 2018-06-06 05:59:09

ohnonot
...again
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 3,190
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

hhh wrote:

a ridiculously long thread of everyone's flavor-of-the-month program

oh, there's nothing wrong with that.
give folks an outlet!
bread and circuses!

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#17 2018-06-06 06:10:40

Head_on_a_Stick
Member
From: London
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 8,759
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

Thread split.


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#18 2018-06-06 11:03:55

altman
Member
From: Canada
Registered: 2015-10-24
Posts: 130

Re: Application(s) of the Day

Thx matrix, never heard about it, might give it a shot.


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Dell Latitude XFR D630 /Intel Core2 Duo T7500/ BunsenLab Helium
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My craptop trio on Linux installs only.

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#19 2018-06-09 04:34:20

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 4,669
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

Just found this, translate-shell https://github.com/soimort/translate-shell
Available in the Debian repos as translate-shell too. cool

Seems to work really well, including speech conversion, lots of cli options.
I'm going to bind it to a key combo and wrap it with xsel, to translate anything on the desktop - much more versatile than a browser extension.

(Small glitch - 0.9.5 Deb version tacks string " null" to the end of the output. Either strip it out in your script, or update to the latest version from GitHub.)

Last edited by johnraff (2018-06-09 05:03:12)


John
--------------------
( a boring Japan blog , Japan Links, idle twitterings  and GitStuff )
In case you forget, the rules.

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#20 2018-06-09 08:09:25

ohnonot
...again
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 3,190
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

johnraff wrote:

Just found this, translate-shell https://github.com/soimort/translate-shell

a wrapper to
a) highlight text
b) press keybind
c) see translation in yad window

#!/bin/bash

xclip -o | trans -e google -b \
| tee >(yad --geometry=300x300 --text-info --wrap) >(xclip -i)
exit 0

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#21 2018-06-22 03:01:55

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 4,669
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

ncdu
Head_on_a_Stick mentioned this a little while ago (thanks!) and reminded me of the name I heard a long time ago. I was using Baobab sometimes for an overview of what was taking up disk space, but ncdu does more or less the same in a terminal and is much faster and lighter. That might be important when your system is grinding to a halt.


John
--------------------
( a boring Japan blog , Japan Links, idle twitterings  and GitStuff )
In case you forget, the rules.

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#22 2018-06-22 03:06:13

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 4,669
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

debian-goodies
Interesting little collection of cli utilities, including checkrestart, which is improved on by:

needrestart
This is a utility for keeping track of processes that need restarting after a library has been upgraded, and is suggested by:

unattended-upgrades
which I just installed on my Helium system, having been quite pleased by the job it did on Hydrogen.


John
--------------------
( a boring Japan blog , Japan Links, idle twitterings  and GitStuff )
In case you forget, the rules.

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#23 2018-06-22 03:44:47

ohnonot
...again
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 3,190
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

johnraff wrote:

ncdu

cli is always nice and leet, but qdirstat is a very useful tool in a way only a gui application can be (and still surprisingly quick).

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#24 2018-07-01 19:52:32

hhh
That's easy!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 6,093
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

On buster and sid, slick-greeter, an alternative to lightdm-gtk-greeter...

Screenshot.th.png

https://github.com/linuxmint/slick-greeter
https://packages.debian.org/search?keyw … ck-greeter

-edit-

This is on a helium install that's had all bunsen-* packages and bl-* configs stripped out (including bl-alternatives), then upgraded to buster and bunsen packages were selectively added back. I'm running bunsen-exit and bunsen-themes, that's it.

Installation...

sudo apt install slick-greeter

Remove lightdm-gtk-greeter (and the settings GUI, if it's been installed)...

sudo apt purge --autoremove lightdm-gtk-greeter*

Some gnome themes are removed, I reinstalled them. Optional but recommended...

sudo apt install gnome-themes-extra

Reboot. You should see the default slick-greeter login page, black with a white-dot grid overlay, a panel and a login window, enter your user name and password to login.



Configuration...

Create and/or edit /etc/lightdm/slick-greeter.conf with the following...

# LightDM GTK+ Configuration
# Available configuration options listed below.
#
# activate-numlock=Whether to activate numlock. This features requires the installation of numlockx. (true or false)
# background=Background file to use, either an image path or a color (e.g. #772953)
# background-color=Background color (e.g. #772953), set before wallpaper is seen
# draw-user-backgrounds=Whether to draw user backgrounds (true or false)
# draw-grid=Whether to draw an overlay grid (true or false)
# show-hostname=Whether to show the hostname in the menubar (true or false)
# show-power=Whether to show the power indicator in the menubar (true or false)
# show-a11y=Whether to show the accessibility options in the menubar (true or false)
# show-keyboard=Whether to show the keyboard indicator in the menubar (true or false)
# show-clock=Whether to show the clock in the menubar (true or false)
# show-quit=Whether to show the quit menu in the menubar (true or false)
# logo=Logo file to use
# other-monitors-logo=Logo file to use for other monitors
# theme-name=GTK+ theme to use
# icon-theme-name=Icon theme to use
# font-name=Font to use
# xft-antialias=Whether to antialias Xft fonts (true or false)
# xft-dpi=Resolution for Xft in dots per inch
# xft-hintstyle=What degree of hinting to use (hintnone/hintslight/hintmedium/hintfull)
# xft-rgba=Type of subpixel antialiasing (none/rgb/bgr/vrgb/vbgr)
# onscreen-keyboard=Whether to enable the onscreen keyboard (true or false)
# high-contrast=Whether to use a high contrast theme (true or false)
# screen-reader=Whether to enable the screen reader (true or false)
# play-ready-sound=A sound file to play when the greeter is ready
# hidden-users=List of usernames that are hidden until a special key combination is hit
# group-filter=List of groups that users must be part of to be shown (empty list shows all users)
# enable-hidpi=Whether to enable HiDPI support (on/off/auto)
# only-on-monitor=Sets the monitor on which to show the login window, -1 means "follow the mouse"
[Greeter]
background=/home/rachel/Pictures/wallpapers/buster.png
draw-grid=false

This shows available options, but most of them are good out-of-the-box so I've only enabled two. You wallpaper path will be different, adjust it. The wallpaper fades in after about a full second on my system, which is too slow but really looks cool when it happens. The default background-color is black, but you can add any color via hex-code, example...

[Greeter]
background=/home/rachel/Pictures/wallpapers/buster.png
background-color=#ffff00
draw-grid=false

Logout to see the changes.

If you'd like to show the users (I'm on a laptop that nobody else uses, I don't need the extra security of entering my user name), edit /usr/share/lightdm/lightdm.conf.d/01-debian.conf...

# Debian specific defaults
#
# - use lightdm-greeter session greeter, points to the etc-alternatives managed
# greeter
# - hide users list by default, we don't want to expose them
# - use Debian specific session wrapper, to gain support for
# /etc/X11/Xsession.d scripts

[Seat:*]
greeter-session=lightdm-greeter
greeter-hide-users=false
session-wrapper=/etc/X11/Xsession

Also hide the systemd Core Dumper entry from the login screen in /etc/lightdm/users.conf...

#
# User accounts configuration
#
# NOTE: If you have AccountsService installed on your system, then LightDM will
# use this instead and these settings will be ignored
#
# minimum-uid = Minimum UID required to be shown in greeter
# hidden-users = Users that are not shown to the user
# hidden-shells = Shells that indicate a user cannot login
#
[UserList]
minimum-uid=500
hidden-users=nobody nobody4 noaccess systemd-coredump
hidden-shells=/bin/false /usr/sbin/nologin

Logout to see your changes.

-edit- The keyboard shortcut for Restart/Shutdown is FnF10, then use your arrow keys.

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#25 2018-07-13 05:00:58

hhh
That's easy!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 6,093
Website

Re: Application(s) of the Day

I forgot that slick-greeter can auto-detect HiDPI, or it can be set manually.

There's a GUI config for it called lightdm-settings that hasn't made it into Debian yet. Ubuntu has it packaged and it installed for me in sid, just needed 2 or 3 dependencies. I haven't installed in Buster, I don't need it now that I have manually configured the greeter.

The wallpaper fade-in isn't working for me ATM, I don't know if it was from an update and I haven't bothered to check the apt logs to see.

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