You are not logged in.

#1 2019-03-03 06:20:48

Bearded_Blunder
Dodging A Bullet
From: Seat: seat0; vc7
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 730

What I love about Debian (today)

Updating unbooted for months laptop.. dual boot.. so Win7
Windows updates .. broken .. troubleshoot.. chase round net uppdating random software from random sites.. ~6 hours and still needs disk cleanup & defrag..

Boot Debian same machine, longer since it was booted, equivalent software installed:
apt-get update, apt-get upgrade, apt-get autoremove, apt-get clean, reboot; done in under 15 minutes, no errors.

So what made you love Debian / Bunsen today?


Blessed is he who expecteth nothing, for he shall not be disappointed...
If there's an obscure or silly way to break it, but you don't know what.. Just ask me

Offline

#2 2019-03-03 10:25:16

Martin
Member
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 316
Website

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

The no-worries stability.
It just works without making a big fuss about it.

/Martin


"Problems worthy of attack
prove their worth by hitting back."
Piet Hein

Offline

#3 2019-03-03 13:04:16

brontosaurusrex
Middle Office
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 1,733

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

Running java app, fractal flame renderer called JWildfire.
ray_b_02.th.png

Last edited by brontosaurusrex (2019-03-03 13:05:53)

Offline

#4 2019-03-03 19:53:26

Anaconda
crypto-anarchist
From: Quesnel BC Canada
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 191

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

@Bearded_Blunder  My experience has been the same. After too long between boots on a spare computer Windows has been a nightmare to update. Time counted in hours and multiple reboots. Debian was a breeze and the time is counted in minutes.

What else do I love above Debian? It's much easier to make properly secure than Windows.

Also I really do like the entire open source philosophy, but not just for software. I've been seeing this idea applied to other areas over the past few years such as 3D printer designs etc. I'm pretty sure that Gnu-Linux and projects like Debian have been a huge influence in this and that without that influence we would not be seeing the spread of open source as a philosophy to anywhere near the same degree as what has been happening.


“The university is well structured, well tooled, to turn out people with all the sharp edges worn off...." Mario Savio
"Protections for anonymous speech are vital to democratic discourse". Help enforce our right to free and anonymous speech by running a Tor relay.

Offline

#5 2019-03-03 22:10:37

hhh
That's it!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 7,440
Website

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

Stability, customizable, variety of desktops/setups possible, the software has come a long way. But stability and security are key. Being able to upgrade after a three-month haitus from the box and having nothing break and everything up-to-date with a sudo apt update && sudo apt upgrade && sudo apt --purge autoremove within a half hour is heaven. Buster/Lithium are going to be great (they already are).

Also, I'm not a big gamer so I have little incentive to dual-boot.

-edit- also, frugality. You can resurrect a ten y.o. laptop by running BL or Debian Xfce or Mate or whatever on it. Under 400mb for the desktop and under 300 for BL/Openbox? You can run the new Plasmas and the desktop will idle under 600mb, my minimal install is in the low 400s I think (I haven't used it in a while, lithium is in production and I haven't missed my plasma desktop at all lately).

Offline

#6 2019-03-03 22:38:17

Bearded_Blunder
Dodging A Bullet
From: Seat: seat0; vc7
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 730

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

I'm seriously considering ditching dual-boot on that one, kinda waiting on Lithium or at least Buster going stable, the software dual-boot is needed for will run happily in a minimal VM. Could even be an NT4/W9x  VM with 64-128 MB of ram, assuming I can figure out how to get files in and out securely without SMBv1.  Maybe NFS will work. Still noodling that.

Today I'm loving individual plain text config files vs regedit :-)


Blessed is he who expecteth nothing, for he shall not be disappointed...
If there's an obscure or silly way to break it, but you don't know what.. Just ask me

Offline

#7 2019-03-03 22:52:36

damo
....moderator....
Registered: 2015-08-20
Posts: 4,873

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

Bearded_Blunder wrote:

....
Today I'm loving individual plain text config files vs regedit :-)

Amen brother! I dimly recall editing the registry, every 30 days, in order to get round time-limited trial software  ops


Be Excellent to Each Other...

FORUM RULES and posting guidelines «» Help page for forum post formatting
Artwork on DeviantArt  «» BunsenLabs on DeviantArt

Online

#8 2019-03-03 23:12:08

hhh
That's it!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 7,440
Website

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

Buster has had a ton of upgrades since the soft-freeze, but they have slowed way down in the last week and I am happy to say not one has been a problem.

Offline

#9 2019-03-04 03:06:33

damo
....moderator....
Registered: 2015-08-20
Posts: 4,873

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

^ Yes, I've only seen one apt-listbugs hit in the last few days, and it wasn't something I needed to worry about


Be Excellent to Each Other...

FORUM RULES and posting guidelines «» Help page for forum post formatting
Artwork on DeviantArt  «» BunsenLabs on DeviantArt

Online

#10 2019-04-17 08:45:26

Colonel Panic
Member
Registered: 2018-11-13
Posts: 34

Re: What I love about Debian (today)

I'd like to take a hint from the OP and talk about Windows as well.

I think in 2019 Debian is a better operating system than Windows. It's very secure because nothing that runs on it has any access to the system files without express admin permission, and its interface is more customisable than that of Windows unless you pay for an aftermarket customising program such as Window Blinds (and maybe even then).

It's also quicker to change workspaces in Debian because you can move directly to the workspace you want without having to cycle through all the workspaces in between as you have to in Windows, there's no need to defrag the hard drive in Debian, and also you can update it on a single terminal and still carry on using the system which you can't do in Windows. Having seen Windows 10 machines in my local community centre spending literally hours installing the latest OS upgrade before they can be used, I believe that this one reason alone is a sufficient reason to prefer Debian to Windows.

Also, you're in complete control of your machine when you run Debian (or any form of Linux; I also run Slackware occasionally) and nothing happens on your computer unless you want it to, whereas Windows always seems to be running some process or other of its own volition that you don't know about. This for me makes running Linux a quieter and more tranquil experience than running Windows.

As others have pointed out it's also more economical with system resources than Windows is; both Bunsen and Debian (with a lightweight window manager such as Openbox) run easily on my 10 year old computer, whereas modern versions of Windows run on it slowly and with difficulty if at all.

To be fair to Windows though, I do think it's a lot better than it used to be. I can remember "DLL hell" in Windows 98 which meant that sometimes an application would stop working as soon as you installed a new one, and also it was prone to memory leaks which meant that the system would only stay up for so long without falling over. I use a Windows 10 machine in my local community centre for printing and both of those are a thing of the past now.

Also, Cortana in Windows 10 offers speech and touch interaction; apparently you can say something like "Weather in Chicago" into a microphone and it will load the requisite app and show the weather in Chicago. I've never seen this but I've no doubt it's impressive to see and would be useful to some people.

I have to say that I miss the so-called "Fisher Price" look of Windows XP when I use a Windows computer; I thought it looked very positive and cheery with all those blues and greens (and I still like the Bliss wallpaper). Windows 7 and 10 look quite gloomy to me by comparison.

Last edited by Colonel Panic (2019-04-21 00:24:01)

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB