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#3976 2021-08-18 04:31:07

jeffreyC
Member
Registered: 2019-09-07
Posts: 68

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

misko_2083 wrote:

... the other half arm themselves to defends the purity of the English language.

Uh, no, we're not like the French, we don't actually care about the so-called 'purity' of the English language.
Much of the language is words that were stolen outright from many other languages, and we don't even bother to file off the serial numbers.
If the English language had its own flag it would be the Jolly Roger.

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#3977 2021-08-18 07:52:11

hhh
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Registered: 2015-09-17
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Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

^ You're goddamn  right, merde! Blass mir!

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#3978 2021-08-18 07:59:41

hhh
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Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 12,315
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Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

misko_2083 wrote:
nore wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:

inventing a new word. :D

It's not easy to invent a derived word that is not in use already. I just thought, that this conversation could be described criticulous, but there it is.

I think everyone on the forum knows the number of words in a dictionary...

According to Wiktionary, it's about 520,000 for English...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_d … r_of_words

That seems low. I bet I can curse 1% of that without even trying, you flat-footed, lint-licking, **** ((( ****** +++++ ???? ~~~~ ...... f*ckers.

Last edited by hhh (2021-08-18 08:00:10)

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#3979 2021-08-18 08:09:50

hhh
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Registered: 2015-09-17
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Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

hhh wrote:

You fish-faced, lint-licking, flat-footed, fungus-infected FUUUU**!!!

Yeah, that's a keeper.

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#3980 2021-08-18 09:42:58

el_koraco
Member
Registered: 2016-02-08
Posts: 139

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

hhh wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:

I think everyone on the forum knows the number of words in a dictionary...

According to Wiktionary, it's about 520,000 for English...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_d … r_of_words

That seems low.

It is extremely high. Most people, even native speakers, have a personal dictionary of less than one thousand words. .

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#3981 2021-08-18 11:11:10

Martin
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From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 581
Website

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

hhh wrote:

That seems low. I bet I can curse 1% of that without even trying, you flat-footed, lint-licking, **** ((( ****** +++++ ???? ~~~~ ...... f*ckers.

Window and f*ck are examples of old Nordic exports. Catamaran and dinghy both have their roots in India. Kindergarten is German.

Goes on forever and it is the same in Swedish. Trade and migration...

http://www.etymonline.com/index.php

/Martin


"Problems worthy of attack
prove their worth by hitting back."
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#3982 2021-08-18 12:55:11

ratcheer
Member
From: USA
Registered: 2015-10-05
Posts: 382

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

I have heard it stated (but I'm not personally prepared to defend it) that English is mainly Germanic words with Nordic syntax.

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#3983 2021-08-18 14:42:39

Martin
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From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 581
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Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

Plus a bunch of Latin and Greek I would say -- simply because that is the case in most of Europe. In Scandinavia we have some Slavic imports too.

A former colleague from Scotland (met his Swedish wife at university...) once told me that he realized while learning Swedish that the difference between Scottish English and 'the Queen's English' was the closeness to Scandinavian languages.

/Martin


"Problems worthy of attack
prove their worth by hitting back."
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#3984 2021-08-18 21:45:56

jeffreyC
Member
Registered: 2019-09-07
Posts: 68

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

ratcheer wrote:

I have heard it stated (but I'm not personally prepared to defend it) that English is mainly Germanic words with Nordic syntax.

It is a hybrid of Saxon and Norman French, created by Norman men-at-arms trying to bed Saxon barmaids.

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#3985 2021-08-18 21:48:11

jeffreyC
Member
Registered: 2019-09-07
Posts: 68

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

hhh wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:
nore wrote:

It's not easy to invent a derived word that is not in use already. I just thought, that this conversation could be described criticulous, but there it is.

I think everyone on the forum knows the number of words in a dictionary...

According to Wiktionary, it's about 520,000 for English...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_d … r_of_words

That seems low. I bet I can curse 1% of that without even trying, you flat-footed, lint-licking, **** ((( ****** +++++ ???? ~~~~ ...... f*ckers.

I have seen it counted as roughly 500,000 words plus another 500,000 technical words.

Last edited by jeffreyC (2021-08-18 21:48:31)

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#3986 2021-08-19 16:23:36

Sector11
Conky 1.9er Mod Squid
From: Upstairs
Registered: 2015-08-20
Posts: 6,813

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

jeffreyC wrote:
ratcheer wrote:

I have heard it stated (but I'm not personally prepared to defend it) that English is mainly Germanic words with Nordic syntax.

It is a hybrid of Saxon and Norman French, created by Norman men-at-arms trying to bed Saxon barmaids.

lol  lol  lol ↑↑↑↑↑  lol  lol
Love that answer!

History of English, and while I am old I do not remember "Old English"

In fact the English I speak is dated.  Living here for 21 years I have not progressed as other Canadians.


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#3987 2021-08-19 19:13:09

ohnonot
...again
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 5,568

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

hhh wrote:

merde! Blass mir!

Shit! Blowjob!

Such witty and humorous remarks.

...


Martin wrote:

In Scandinavia we have some Slavic imports too.

Curious minds want to know!

Finland is not Scandinavia, but here's a fun fact: the Finnish word for bread comes from Russian.
It's "leipä" - from Russian "Хлеб" ("chleb"). Quite a stretch, pronounciation-wise. Also, it makes me think that Finns used to be so poor, even bread was a foreign commodity...


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#3988 2021-08-19 21:02:09

Martin
Member
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 581
Website

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

ohnonot wrote:
Martin wrote:

In Scandinavia we have some Slavic imports too.

Curious minds want to know!

Finland is not Scandinavia, but here's a fun fact: the Finnish word for bread comes from Russian.
It's "leipä" - from Russian "Хлеб" ("chleb"). Quite a stretch, pronounciation-wise. Also, it makes me think that Finns used to be so poor, even bread was a foreign commodity...

"Torg" (market place or city square) comes from ancient Russian. There were, after all, some vikings traveling through Russia on the rivers. As they wanted to go home through the same system of rivers they traded rather than plundered.

Modern Russian uses another word according to a Russian colleague.

I have been told the Austrian city Graz got its name from the Slavic word "grad".

Talking about bread, I understand "smörgåsbord" has spread far outside Sweden.

/Martin


"Problems worthy of attack
prove their worth by hitting back."
Piet Hein

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#3989 2021-08-19 21:51:14

el_koraco
Member
Registered: 2016-02-08
Posts: 139

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

jeffreyC wrote:

created by Norman men-at-arms trying to bed Saxon barmaids.

this is probably how all languages came to be. then they get reverse codified and the codifiers take all the glory.

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#3990 2021-08-20 05:35:04

ohnonot
...again
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 5,568

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

Martin wrote:

"Torg" (market place or city square) comes from ancient Russian.

Never thought of that. Finnish: "tori". I thought it came from Swedish - as many Finnish words do - let's see if you can recognize some of them: peili, timantti, nikkari, sänky... I could go on.

Another very common, originally Russian word in Finnish language: piirakka = Пирог.

I love how they twisted the pronunciations of all these words to fit their own idiom - but every language does that.


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#3991 2021-08-20 05:35:55

misko_2083
Member
Registered: 2016-05-24
Posts: 507

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

jeffreyC wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:

... the other half arm themselves to defends the purity of the English language.

Uh, no, we're not like the French, we don't actually care about the so-called 'purity' of the English language.
Much of the language is words that were stolen outright from many other languages, and we don't even bother to file off the serial numbers.
If the English language had its own flag it would be the Jolly Roger.

Avast, ye salty sea dogs.
Hoist the Jolly Roger and ready to plank!

The flag is already taken for the Pirate English.

Last edited by misko_2083 (2021-08-20 05:59:15)


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#3992 2021-08-20 06:33:33

Martin
Member
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 581
Website

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

ohnonot wrote:

Another very common, originally Russian word in Finnish language: piirakka = Пирог.

Not to be confused with pirogue: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pirogue
:-)

Regarding twisting foreign words and expressions: We have a pronoun in Swedish that doesn't make much sense if you read the words: "Ont krut förgås ej lätt". A simplistic translation into English results in "Bad gunpowder does not perish easily". Eh?

So what is going on here? The key is the German origin of this pronoun. It starts "Unkraut... " so the German pronoun translates in to English as "Weeds do not perish easily", which makes sense as a pronoun (makes me think of work).

German "um die Ecke" has become "om hörnet" in Swedish ("around the corner"). The strange thing here is the word "om". In all other cases it translates into "if" in English.

/Martin


"Problems worthy of attack
prove their worth by hitting back."
Piet Hein

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#3993 2021-08-20 06:48:56

misko_2083
Member
Registered: 2016-05-24
Posts: 507

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

hhh wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:
nore wrote:

It's not easy to invent a derived word that is not in use already. I just thought, that this conversation could be described criticulous, but there it is.

I think everyone on the forum knows the number of words in a dictionary...

According to Wiktionary, it's about 520,000 for English...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_d … r_of_words

That seems low. I bet I can curse 1% of that without even trying, you flat-footed, lint-licking, **** ((( ****** +++++ ???? ~~~~ ...... f*ckers.

There aren't that many swear words, I think. big_smile
Expressions on the other swear (hand) are numerous.
How many words per minute can you say?
520.000/words_per_minute=mintes_to_say_520.000_words

Martin wrote:
ohnonot wrote:
Martin wrote:

In Scandinavia we have some Slavic imports too.

Curious minds want to know!

Finland is not Scandinavia, but here's a fun fact: the Finnish word for bread comes from Russian.
It's "leipä" - from Russian "Хлеб" ("chleb"). Quite a stretch, pronounciation-wise. Also, it makes me think that Finns used to be so poor, even bread was a foreign commodity...

"Torg" (market place or city square) comes from ancient Russian. There were, after all, some vikings traveling through Russia on the rivers. As they wanted to go home through the same system of rivers they traded rather than plundered.

Modern Russian uses another word according to a Russian colleague.

I have been told the Austrian city Graz got its name from the Slavic word "grad".

Talking about bread, I understand "smörgåsbord" has spread far outside Sweden.

/Martin

Hey, we say Hleb (Хлеб) too. But when I read "leipä" it's leaning close to "lepa" which means pretty or "lipa" which is a specie of tree.
In some parts of the country people tend to drop letters and pronounce 'leb or 'leba so it's more similar to "leipa".
Trg (Трг) is a town square, not only in ancient Russian. big_smile
Trgovati means to trade.
Grad is a town/city, and ocasionally hail.


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#3994 2021-08-20 07:16:31

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 8,315
Website

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

ohnonot wrote:

I love how they twisted the pronunciations of all these words to fit their own idiom.

I particularly like hampurilainen. smile


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#3995 2021-08-20 07:21:30

damo
....moderator....
Registered: 2015-08-20
Posts: 6,718

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

Grad is a town/city, and ocasionally hail.

"hail" as in hailstones? Or "hail" as in greet?

Grad/greet are similar sounds. And graupel is hard pellets of snow in German.  Connected?


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#3996 2021-08-20 07:49:03

misko_2083
Member
Registered: 2016-05-24
Posts: 507

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

damo wrote:

Grad is a town/city, and ocasionally hail.

"hail" as in hailstones? Or "hail" as in greet?

Grad/greet are similar sounds. And graupel is hard pellets of snow in German.  Connected?

Hail as pellets of ice that rain and destroy crops in the summer.

Grad/greet Maybe it's similar if "a" in "grad" is pronunced as "e". big_smile
"A" is always prounced as "a "in "car", and always the same no matter where is it in the word begining middle or end, and what letter follows or precedes it.
Letter "e" always as "e" in let
Letter "i" is always as "e" in "east"
Having that in mind, if we would import English word "greet", then it would be spelled and pronounced as "grit".

Did I just write "spelled"? Ha, ha I meant written, there is no spelling.
We just write as we pronunce it because of one letter for one vocal rule.

When I think about it all the languages imported from other languages.
There are few thousands of Turkish words in Serbian language because they invaded for four centuries.
But written and pronounced differently.

Lately kids adopted "кринџ" (lat. krindž) from Youtube. Internet culture term cringe, cringy.

Last edited by misko_2083 (2021-08-20 08:15:23)


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#3997 2021-08-20 08:32:20

Martin
Member
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 581
Website

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

misko_2083 wrote:

There are few thousands of Turkish words in Serbian language because they invaded for four centuries.

A traditional Swedish dish is "kåldolme". Both the food and "dolme" are Turkish imports. Early 18th century I think.

/Martin


"Problems worthy of attack
prove their worth by hitting back."
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#3998 2021-08-20 09:12:41

misko_2083
Member
Registered: 2016-05-24
Posts: 507

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

Martin wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:

There are few thousands of Turkish words in Serbian language because they invaded for four centuries.

A traditional Swedish dish is "kåldolme". Both the food and "dolme" are Turkish imports. Early 18th century I think.

/Martin

Sarma, the cabbage rolls, or vine leaves rolls?
Or stuffed peppers?
I like all of those. We use the minced pork meat for those.
I mean we use pork for uhm, well generally everything big_smile , regarding food
but we have vegetarian versions of sarma and stuffed peppers for fasting days.

Yesterday I had something different popara.
Since I couldn't eat much these days because of delta layer virus attack,
despite the double shots of vaccines, hleb (bread) left laying in the box for three days.
So I chopped it to bits (3-4 cm cubes) and boiled water with some salt.
I added the bread to the boiling watter and mixed while boiling for a couple minutes.
Some people like to add cheese but I preffer to add it later in the plate.
I'm not sure what't the English name for old bread meals.
I may be wrong thinking the English version of "popara" is sweet. smile

I'm not into sweet version, here's the recipe for both.
https://www.instructables.com/Intro-54/
Some people add too much water, too little bread, I make it thick.
Some even use milk or kaymak. So many variations of one simple meal.

Last edited by misko_2083 (2021-08-20 12:04:18)


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#3999 2021-08-20 14:21:34

Martin
Member
From: Stockholm, Sweden
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 581
Website

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

misko_2083 wrote:
Martin wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:

There are few thousands of Turkish words in Serbian language because they invaded for four centuries.

A traditional Swedish dish is "kåldolme". Both the food and "dolme" are Turkish imports. Early 18th century I think.

/Martin

Sarma, the cabbage rolls, or vine leaves rolls?
Or stuffed peppers?
I like all of those. We use the minced pork meat for those.

Cabbage rolls.

We do stuffed peppers too but that is a much later development and is not associated "dolme".

/Martin


"Problems worthy of attack
prove their worth by hitting back."
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#4000 2021-08-20 16:13:55

damo
....moderator....
Registered: 2015-08-20
Posts: 6,718

Re: Completely Off Topic Chat

Stale bread soaked with milk and a beaten egg, maybe some dried fruit, and baked > bread pudding


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