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#726 2021-07-28 04:54:41

glittersloth
buena piñata
Registered: 2015-09-30
Posts: 1,382

Re: BunsenLabs film thread

misko_2083 wrote:

With Slavic languages there are grammar things you didn’t even know existed if you only know Romance and Germanic languages.

Like all that profanity involving sheep?

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#727 2021-07-28 06:58:12

ohnonot
...again
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 5,554

Re: BunsenLabs film thread

johnraff wrote:

Yugoslavian?? Is that a language?

Used to be called Serbo-Croatian a long, long time ago. But honestly I don't know if that was a construct imposed by the government, or if those languages are really close enough to be "umbrellad" in this way.

The borderline between dialect and language is fluid.

I appreciate (*) that "the civilised world" tried to tie them together along country borders (hundreds of years ago; Germany is a good example for that), but obviously that also has its disadvantages.

(*) why? well, imagine my grandma speaking this southern dialect, I literally could not understand a word she was saying, but thankfully she also spoke the standard language that evryone understands.


Give to COVAX! Here or here. (explanation)

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#728 2021-07-28 07:25:45

el_koraco
Member
Registered: 2016-02-08
Posts: 138

Re: BunsenLabs film thread

johnraff wrote:

Yugoslavian?? Is that a language?

English grammar is kind of subtle and infuriating with strange exceptions, but surely German has enough grammar already?
Or were your they and we the other way round?

This is the easiest way to avoid people getting into an argument. Serbo-Croatian is among the most difficult Indo-European languages when it comes to grammar. This serves the poets well, but makes the poetry pretty hard to translate accurately.

English is funny, it used to be a pure Germanic language until William the Conqueror invaded Britain, whereupon he replaced all the nobility with his own Normans, who were French speakers, and made French the court language. This led to a centuries long mix in which English and French formed a unique combination, with a largely Germanic vocabulary and a largely Romance grammar.

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#729 2021-07-28 07:31:54

el_koraco
Member
Registered: 2016-02-08
Posts: 138

Re: BunsenLabs film thread

ohnonot wrote:
johnraff wrote:

Yugoslavian?? Is that a language?

Used to be called Serbo-Croatian a long, long time ago. But honestly I don't know if that was a construct imposed by the government, or if those languages are really close enough to be "umbrellad" in this way.

It is still called Serbo-Croatian in international linguistics.

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#730 2021-07-28 11:12:52

misko_2083
Member
Registered: 2016-05-24
Posts: 500

Re: BunsenLabs film thread

glittersloth wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:

With Slavic languages there are grammar things you didn’t even know existed if you only know Romance and Germanic languages.

Like all that profanity involving sheep?

I don't know nothing about that. :-)
Double negation, perfect example.
Because two times nothing is still nothing.

Seriously now, how did I managed to mess up this perfectly fine film thread that I like?
Must be a special talent.

Anyway....let's get on with it.  * When there is a ball, let it be a masquerade ball.

* A sentence that is uttered after a long and peripetium-filled day, in which everything went wrong and when nothing is important to us anymore and we let everything go down the drain.


They use force, to make you do, what the deciders, have decided you must do!

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#731 2021-07-28 19:14:31

el_koraco
Member
Registered: 2016-02-08
Posts: 138

Re: BunsenLabs film thread

misko_2083 wrote:

Seriously now, how did I managed to mess up this perfectly fine film thread that I like?
Must be a special talent.

It wasn't you, it was hhh with his disgusting love for Goethe.

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#732 2021-07-28 21:23:20

hhh
Meep!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 12,178
Website

Re: BunsenLabs film thread

Well, in Murder On The Orient Express (1974), the Princess Dragomiroff has her assistant, Hildegarde Schmidt, read Goethe to her (Kennst du das Land), so nyeah, OT all along.

Can't find a clip uploaded, dang it.

https://agathachristie.fandom.com/wiki/ … .281974.29

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#733 2021-07-30 16:15:35

misko_2083
Member
Registered: 2016-05-24
Posts: 500

Re: BunsenLabs film thread

el_koraco wrote:
misko_2083 wrote:

Seriously now, how did I managed to mess up this perfectly fine film thread that I like?
Must be a special talent.

It wasn't you, it was hhh with his disgusting love for Goethe.

Even hhh has to find that funny.
The real issue was that I didn't see the wood stump in the grass and it tripped on it. Hit it with ankle hard.
Went to put iodine but the wound infected. And that hurts.
I know, I know, should have used rakija instead. big_smile

@Hhh I dont remember that scene with princess Dragomiroff. Dragomiroff sounds like a fussion of Slavic and German last name, likely East German.
Many people in East Germany have Slavic roots. Because there were a couple of tribes living there and got conquered, assimilated & converted to Christianity.  But last names and toponyms remained.

Murder on the Orient Express '74 https://m.ok.ru/video/28883552834
@hhh recital starts at 1:08:00.

Last edited by misko_2083 (2021-07-30 20:49:28)


They use force, to make you do, what the deciders, have decided you must do!

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