You are not logged in.

#1 2020-09-22 20:33:34

trilobite
Member
From: Saskatchewan, Canada
Registered: 2017-06-27
Posts: 29

BL Lithium versus Windows 7

I'm a collector of cast off laptops (mostly free, I do ocassionaly pay a little for one). My usual process is wipe the windows and put on Linux (these days BL-Lithium), and ensure they'll do video calls, play Netflix and similar, process words with Libre Office.  Then I give them to older adults who are needing one.  I've also given a few to refugees. This is booming free market in these virus times. 

Well, I got given one which had a windows 7 disk in the DVD drive.  So why not reinstall windows 7?  Well I'll tell you why I won't repeat the exercise.  Because t takes 3 hours and hadn't done its updates yet.  But I followed through.  Allowing that I don't 'get' Windows, maybe my day long adventure should actually be 4 to 6 hours.

BL Lithium is taking less than 30 mins to install, update, put xfce desktop one and be done. (Perhaps updates take longer for others, we've got fibre optic as part of the publicly-owned ISP here, it's really fast). I'd be interested if Windows 10 does the same.


{Linux-using people I haven't met are friends yet to be made.}

Offline

#2 2020-09-23 00:49:52

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 7,344
Website

Re: BL Lithium versus Windows 7

^My current desktop (ssd + hdd) came with Windows 10 on the ssd. I wiped it and reinstalled to a partition of the hdd in case it was needed for BIOS upgrades or something. It all ended working OK (Windows is available on the grub menu) but yes, it was a long long process with endless reboots. Not to mention how long it took just to change the interface language from Japanese to English. Sigh...


...elevator in the Brain Hotel, broken down but just as well...
( a boring Japan blog (currently paused), idle Twitterings and GitStuff )

Introduction to the Bunsenlabs Lithium Desktop

Offline

#3 2020-09-26 03:22:41

hhh
Meep!
Registered: 2015-09-17
Posts: 10,590
Website

Re: BL Lithium versus Windows 7

Anecdotal... I recently bought a new, old laptop (Dell Latitude e6400) for cheap online that had Windows 10 on it. Just the Windows first-boot/registration process to get the thing booted so I could wipe Windows was enough of a hassle to not regret wiping Windows and installing Debian. I do still have the recovery partition if I want to wipe everything and use Windows again, or dual-boot.

But the more that time passes and Windows worsens in many ways, and Linux and Debian improve in nearly every way... I can't imagine using Windows as my daily desktop any more.

Offline

#4 2020-09-26 14:54:28

DeepDayze
Like sands through an hourglass...
From: In Linux Land
Registered: 2017-05-28
Posts: 996

Re: BL Lithium versus Windows 7

BL is way faster than Windows 7 in my experience and I hardly use Windows now except for Win 10 in a VM that has Office 2016 installed for managing those documents that LO chokes on.

Of course I use Windows 10 on my work laptop (that's a must).


Real Men Use Linux

Offline

#5 2020-09-26 15:14:15

twoion
ほやほや
Registered: 2015-08-10
Posts: 2,964

Re: BL Lithium versus Windows 7

trilobite wrote:

BL Lithium is taking less than 30 mins to install, update, put xfce desktop one and be done. (Perhaps updates take longer for others, we've got fibre optic as part of the publicly-owned ISP here, it's really fast). I'd be interested if Windows 10 does the same.

Win10 has its edge cases but it's patching itself faster than Win Vista at the very least. All in all Windows updates are still stupidly slow, owing to legacy I guess. However, macOS updates are just as weird, so this is no outlier.

The solution is to bake an install medium with all patches applied, or use a brand new install medium (like for Windows 10, these are simply downloadable). People started doing custom installation media after the Windows XP Service Packs I think.

Note that the most important Windows customer, institutions, usually do not have this problem if they have a competent IT team. Some updates may trickle in and install slowly, but a properly managed Win10 enterprise workplace does it so the user doesn't notice. Enterprise IT is not bound as tightly to Microsoft for updates; they can push updates in batches to lessen impact, or to test a rollout. Always remember, you're getting the beta testerconsumer experience. And there are no update marathons when rolling out new machines; enterprise IT usually bakes Golden Images and can provision new machines from an up-to-date base install quickly.

Overall, macOS still has the best install experience, esp. when upgrading; it can restore all system settings, applications, and application settings using time machine. You can even connect your old macbook to the new macbook and the new macbook will pull all your settings + files from the old one. It's almost user proof and probably a big time saver/relief for non-IT people or folks who don't like spending time on "setting up their new PC". Some might argue that in Linux you can just copy a few config files from the homedir, but I guarantee you that a) when upgrading, some files might break newer application versions or settings will get lost, and b) you'll miss some settings. And restoring my full setup from scratch under Linux would still take quite a while. Which is why I don't reinstall, I transfer the install do the new disk/SSD, enlarge the partitions, enlarge the volumes, and then continue using the "old" os on the "new" computer. I haven't reinstalled my desktop Linux since 2014, and I don't really wanna, because it's going to be a pain.


Per aspera ad astra.

Offline

#6 2020-09-27 01:05:56

johnraff
nullglob
From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 7,344
Website

Re: BL Lithium versus Windows 7

Much as I love Linux...

twoion wrote:

Some might argue that in Linux you can just copy a few config files from the homedir, but I guarantee you that
a) when upgrading, some files might break newer application versions or settings will get lost, and
b) you'll miss some settings.

and
c) not all necessary settings and tweaks are in $HOME anyway.

Migrating from Helium to Lithium between two partitions of the same computer took a couple of weeks till everything was picked up. (And some stuff, like configuring Apache, is still not done.)


...elevator in the Brain Hotel, broken down but just as well...
( a boring Japan blog (currently paused), idle Twitterings and GitStuff )

Introduction to the Bunsenlabs Lithium Desktop

Offline

Board footer

Powered by FluxBB