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#1 2016-01-14 15:15:39

perchslayer
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From: Auburn, California - US
Registered: 2016-01-12
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Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

I am off and ready to go to the races. And this time I want to do it right. I have read some differing opinions about the best way to go to set up my hard drive, but I want to ask in here. I am a n00b, of course, so I am going to use the walk-through in the install sequence, not GParted ahead of time or anything. Anyway, drawing from these 3 posts, I get varying ideas:

From damo 5 years ago: HowTo: Install Bunsen Labs With the Graphical Installer

From StackExchange: Best Disk Partitioning Scheme for a Linux-based Developer Machine

From RedHat: .15.5. Recommended Partitioning Scheme 9.15.5.1. x86, AMD64, and Intel 64 systems

So, generally, am I better off just having one thing as @damo describes? Or would it be better to define, say, a swap, a home, and a root? And make them small(er) for resizing later? Or what?

I do plan on keeping this distro on my laptop for the foreseeable future, so that is not an issue.

MOD EDIT: fixed first URL.

Last edited by johnraff (2019-08-19 02:15:40)


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#2 2016-01-14 15:33:29

Horizon_Brave
Operating System: Linux-Nettrix
Registered: 2015-10-18
Posts: 1,473

Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

I've always found this as a question of what you'll be doing with the OS. For work, we limit swap space to next to nothing, but keep /var it's own partition with plenty of growing space due to the heavy storage of logs. You may want to do something like this for your /home directory. If you know you'll be storing a lot of images, music, files etc there.

And like you said, you can grow sizes from there, but it's good to partition it the way you wish from the get go, as re-partitioning can get hairy.  What I'd suggest is doing this all in a VM first. Make a couple of installs of B.L in Virtualbox or something, see which scheme you like, what would be easiest to modify and go with that one.


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#3 2016-01-14 16:54:27

twoion
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Registered: 2015-08-10
Posts: 2,482

Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

perchslayer wrote:

I am off and ready to go to the races. And this time I want to do it right. I have read some differing opinions about the best way to go to set up my hard drive, but I want to ask in here. I am a n00b, of course, so I am going to use the walk-through in the install sequence, not GParted ahead of time or anything. Anyway, drawing from these 3 posts, I get varying ideas:

From damo 5 years ago: HowTo: Install Bunsen Labs With the Graphical Installer

From StackExchange: Best Disk Partitioning Scheme for a Linux-based Developer Machine

From RedHat: .15.5. Recommended Partitioning Scheme 9.15.5.1. x86, AMD64, and Intel 64 systems

So, generally, am I better off just having one thing as @damo describes? Or would it be better to define, say, a swap, a home, and a root? And make them small(er) for resizing later? Or what?

I do plan on keeping this distro on my laptop for the foreseeable future, so that is not an issue.

It really doesn't matter much. Only concern is file systems; stuff like zfs and btrfs surely allows more much magic behind the scenes; however on my main computer I like to keep things as simple as possible for my needs.  Usually, yoU'd want to have what you need while remaining flexible enough to make adjustments later.

Use UEFI/GPT if your computer supports it. Just throw 500M on the FAT32 EFI partition and you'll be good.

1. 500M FAT32 EFI -> /boot/efi
2. 500M ext2 kernel/initramfs -> /boot
3. Rest of the disk -> cryptodisk using LUKS because I encrypt everything
   3.1 LVM volume group (fills the entire cryptodisk)
   ---------------------
   Below here, everything is a logical volume
   ---------------------
   3.1.1 50G rootfs of main Linux OS w/ ext4, true and tested, default mount options -> /
   3.1.2 300G for home/userdata w/ ext4 -> /home
   3.1.3 300G-1T for large media files on XFS -> /home/$username/library
   3.1.4 RAM-sized SWAP space

The rest of the disk is left free for other distros' rootfs, for enlarging the existing logical volumes if needed, or for extra partitions if I need it (for example, LXC can use a LVM thinpool as storage backend).

I never store too much data on my laptop anyway; I keep external disks for that.

If I had a home server/workstation with terabytes of storage, I would use the same basic schema for the main OS but would put everything below /home on a RAID10 storage array, on top of that I'd put a separate LVM volume group.

I would only use what I'd also use on a production server of commercial/business operations relevance (laptops are kind of special because of their limitations). That means no btrfs becaus it is too fancy, not enough tested and still has issues. ZFS on the other hand could replace the LVM-on-RAID part (opinions differ on this), however it is frequently used on servers.

LVM is a constant in my setups because being bound by disk geometry is IMO a really unnecessary constraint for desktop computers nowadays.

Here's my current disk layout:

NAME                      MAJ:MIN RM   SIZE RO TYPE  MOUNTPOINT
sda                         8:0    0 465.8G  0 disk  
├─sda1                      8:1    0   512M  0 part  /boot/efi
├─sda2                      8:2    0   200M  0 part  /boot
└─sda3                      8:3    0   420G  0 part  
  └─lvm                   254:0    0   420G  0 crypt 
    ├─rinnevg-swap        254:1    0    10G  0 lvm   [SWAP]
    ├─rinnevg-root        254:2    0    50G  0 lvm   /
    ├─rinnevg-home        254:3    0   100G  0 lvm   /home
    └─rinnevg-library     254:4    0   250G  0 lvm   /home/joj/lib
sdb                         8:16   0 931.5G  0 disk  
├─sdb1                      8:17   0  46.6G  0 part  
│ └─za                    254:5    0  46.6G  0 crypt /mnt/zanime2
└─sdb2                      8:18   0   885G  0 part  
  └─NietzscheCrypt        254:6    0   885G  0 crypt 
    ├─zarathustra-backup0 254:7    0   200G  0 lvm   
    ├─zarathustra-backup1 254:8    0   200G  0 lvm   
    ├─zarathustra-anime   254:9    0   200G  0 lvm   /mnt/zarathustra-anime
    └─zarathustra-library 254:10   0   200G  0 lvm   /mnt/zarathustra-library

Look at mdadm and lvm in depth, read a bit -- these are extremely powerful and well-documented tools which allow for many advanced and useful features; one obvious feature of lvm is snapshots. You should treat zfs and btrfs separately though. They to a certain extent do what mdadm, lvm and the file system do all at once but are hugely complex. Use them if you have understood them well enough.


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#4 2016-01-14 17:12:14

damo
....moderator....
Registered: 2015-08-20
Posts: 5,057

Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

I haven't experimented with "fancy" options like @twoion et al, but one thing I do is have a small /home partion, but have most of my data in a separate partition. This is mounted in fstab, and I change eg `$HOME/Documents` to a symlink to `/mnt/data/documents`.

This allows me to have the same "/home" data shared between different distros in a multiboot setup, without affecting the different $HOME configs.

BTW the HowTo linked to definitely isn't 5 years old tongue


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#5 2016-01-14 20:03:35

eight.bit.al
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From: The top of the World
Registered: 2015-10-01
Posts: 294
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Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

^ Does this affect dot files in /home between the different distros?

8bit

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#6 2016-01-14 20:10:30

damo
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Registered: 2015-08-20
Posts: 5,057

Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

eight.bit.al wrote:

^ Does this affect dot files in /home between the different distros?

8bit

You either need to have '/home' in the '/' partition, or a different '/home' for each install.


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#7 2016-01-14 20:14:13

eight.bit.al
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Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

Ahh, sorry I misread #4. (as you answered my question, already)

8bit

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#8 2016-01-14 20:55:14

Head_on_a_Stick
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From: London
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 8,759
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Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

Just to note:

twoion wrote:

Use UEFI/GPT if your computer supports it. Just throw 500M on the FAT32 EFI partition and you'll be good.

1. 500M FAT32 EFI -> /boot/efi

The BunsenLabs installer doesn't currently support UEFI but if the EFI system partition is created and mounted to /boot/efi in the partitioning section of the installer it makes conversion to UEFI simpler.

This will not install a UEFI system but it will create the required mount points and fstab entry.

See my signature for details of the conversion method.


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#9 2016-01-15 01:23:29

tknomanzr
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From: Around the Bend
Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 1,029

Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

I prefer separate /home and /root partitions. That way stuff is more modular. I also have an NAS appliance for external storage of backups, media and other stuff that is important to me. However, I am apt to gut and rebuild a system for testing purposes or whatever at any given time, so I have gradually learned how to set my systems up so that I can rebuild them rapidly.

Last edited by tknomanzr (2016-01-15 01:23:49)

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#10 2016-01-17 10:17:32

KrunchTime
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Registered: 2015-09-29
Posts: 857

Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

I have separate home, data, and encrypted partitions.  If I'm using a machine with a HDD, then I'll also setup a separate /tmp partition.  Someone mentioned a separate /var partition.  I did that a long time ago, but for regular desktop use, it isn't necessary IMO.  The suggestion is probably better for server environments.

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#11 2019-08-16 15:39:05

penguinator
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Registered: 2019-05-13
Posts: 30

Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

perchslayer wrote:

The above link isn't working. It should be:
https://forums.bunsenlabs.org/viewtopic.php?id=518


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#12 2019-08-16 22:26:17

damo
....moderator....
Registered: 2015-08-20
Posts: 5,057

Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

penguinator wrote:
perchslayer wrote:

The above link isn't working. It should be:
https://forums.bunsenlabs.org/viewtopic.php?id=518

The link works here though: Getting Started»List of Useful HowTo's»HowTo: Install BunsenLabs with the Graphical Installer


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#13 2019-08-19 02:16:35

johnraff
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From: Nagoya, Japan
Registered: 2015-09-09
Posts: 5,721
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Re: Best Practice? Optimum Disk setup-partitioning?

OP URL now fixed. Thanks to penguinator.


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